Articles filed under Special Report

  • Post-Sandy Report: Resilience and Resolve



    While the damage from Sandy is unprecedented and a complete picture of the losses the dance community in New York and New Jersey have suffered won’t be fully evident for weeks to come, Dance/USA’s From the Green Room has reached out to its colleagues and constituents in the affected region via social networking, email blasts, and personal messages to put together an anecdotal report of some of the damage.

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  • Critic/Scholar v. New York State -- The Nite Moves Case Reaches the Highest Court, Part 2


    On September 5, 2012, the seven-member New York Court of Appeals heard Nite Moves’ legal challenge to the Tribunal’s decision that exotic dance was not a live choreographed performance and consequently exempt from taxation as stated in law. Read Judith Lynne Hanna’s account of this intriguing case and the ramifications it could have on the dance community.

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  • After Sandy the Show Must Go On


    It’s been a week since Hurricane Sandy left its mark on many dance companies and theaters in the New York and New Jersey area. We hear accounts of lost rehearsal time, cancelled shows, destroyed offices, lives altered. While the New Jersey and New York areas bore the brunt of the storm, we in the dance field will be experiencing the after-effects of this natural disaster for months and years to come. What have we learned from other events, like Hurricanes Katrina and Gustav?

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  • Can ‘Breaking Pointe’ Fix Ballet?


    Can “Breaking Pointe” do for ballet what ballet companies have been struggling to accomplish for decades now? That is, lure newer, younger audiences to theaters for live classical ballet?

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  • Copyright and Choreography: The Good, The Bad, and The Fair


    Copyright protection has been both a boon and curse: A boon, if you are able to protect your work and receive income through license agreements; a curse when it becomes an obstacle to getting your work seen and studied when it needs to be. Read Elizabeth Jackson's clear and concise explanation.

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  • Making a Mark: Dance and Social Justice


    Increasingly, community outreach is just the tip of the iceberg for some dance companies, and artists and social justice organizations are finding mutual benefits to deeper and more prolonged partnerships. That deliberate choice of engagement, as opposed to outreach, seeks to erase some of the traditional hierarchies between dancers and community members.

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  • Safe House: Dancing in the Ivory Tower, Part 2


    It’s been said that the university ranks as one of the chief supporters of the arts in the United States. With the migration of more and more working choreographers into university environments, it’s clear that artists are able to continue to create both inside and outside of these institutions. While the halls of academia offer some distinct advantages, most particularly to oft-itinerant and nearly always-struggling dance artists, other challenges and demands can sap their time and energy in their new environment.

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  • Safe House: Dancing in the Ivory Tower, Part 1


    It’s been said that the university ranks as one of the chief supporters of the arts in the United States. With the migration of more and more working choreographers into university environments, it’s clear that artists are able to continue to create both inside and outside of these institutions. While the halls of academia offer some distinct advantages, most particularly to oft-itinerant and nearly always-struggling dance artists, other challenges and demands can sap their time and energy in their new environment.

    [Read more →]


  • How Long? The Life Span of a Dance Company


    What constitutes the life span for a dance company? Is it better to see a company close rather than become a shadow of what it once was? Responding to a recent Facebook inquiry, Houston-based dance writer Nancy Wozny stated, “The life span of a dance company should be as individual as the artists themselves. Not every arts organization needs to be around forever. Some pop up as a result of a particular time in an artist’s life, and the world they operate in. Times shift and things do go away. I feel we need to be more welcoming of things that end.”

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  • Things I Learned About Artistry at the 2012 Dance Forum in NYC


    Artistry doesn’t come out of thin air; it evolves by being nurtured, sweated over, re-worked, perhaps a little bloodied, and revived. Believe it or not, sometimes art needs to fail. Jennifer S.B Calienes, director of Tallahassee’s Maggie Allesee National Center for Choreography, one of our nations top-tier dance residency programs, says of necessary artistic failures, “Some of the best work dies ... but it is critical that (dance makers) have that time and space to think, develop, edit, and hone.” These efforts are called the artistic process.

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Covering the business of dance for dancers, choreographers, administrators, dance organizations and foundations with news, commentary and discussion of issues relevant to the field.
Editor: Lisa Traiger

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